Monday, May 26, 2014

Chuck Senrick - Dreamin'


Here's one I just had to share.  Hipped by my good friend Mark, I was told to expect a supper club organ player that grapples with something much larger than his square acre of Fettucine Alfredo over the course of an album's worth of original songs.  And it's true, as Senrick's effortlessly simple and often repetitive chord changes stare you in the eye immediately across an empty room, a mannequin framework of drum machine pitter patter coercing his riffs and croons forward, the elegance of his voice blanketing wide eyes and a child-like heart in crushed velvet, satin-like.  A jazz man.  There's a lot of panache on display across this record, and I would argue that every song hits in one way or another.  Senrick has the ability of a great songwriter, to push you to a kind of elemental catharsis in a bridge and hold you there trapped in an amber glow over the course of the next verse.  He builds craft simply into each song, quietly, so that his subtle genius creeps up on you and it's totally fulfilling.  He has a joyful soul.  The mood is not explicitly melancholy, or wistful, but does occupy a kind of cartoon-like jazzy downs.  It's a rendering, not unlike an imagined world.  It's this latter fact that pushes the record that much further into greatness for me, as he's clearly a man at home in his imagination, and there lies the freedom that we all want to feel in music.  He comes from a familiar place, but he leaves you with the delight in something new.  The record morphs and mingles over the course of it's two sides into a wonderful micro-climate between jazz, soul, and lounge music.  Lyrically the concerns are simple, often universal, and times verge on the philosophic.  When so many people linger most exclusively in affairs of the heart it's nice to hear a grown man musing about what makes kids different from grown ups, or how he feels about his lost dog.  It's not to say that "Dreamin'" does not contain love songs, but they're often tempered and have a self-assured maturity that I'm assuming came from a married man (see "Wedding Trilogy").  Across the disc his vantage remains oddly pure and graceful in a way I don't always associate with the period, as on "Downtown" he spins with clarity how meaningless the rat race appears if you actually stop and observe things.  These concerns are never directives though, as he works like a painter, and the blended color is his own labyrinth for simple truths.  Take his ode to a friend who succumbed to drugs, "Drop a Dime," which blends metaphors rapidly creating a portrait of the addict as a part of a universal concern, "he's a little bit you, a little bit of me," yet pushing the song predominantly through a highly repetitive chorus that seems to illustratively offer that same man's base reality ("drop a dime, drop a dime").  The juxtaposition allows you to enter his world.  It's this kind of enchanting subtlety that makes the record, and is not altogether what one may have gathered from drinking in the soft blue cover with that hand drawn mug boomeranging out of a suburban abyss.  Or maybe it is that simple: music for a late afternoon, perhaps a bit wet with rain, when one might plunk down in a bean bag chair, with one light on and eat a graham cracker.  Haha.  I mean while you listen to the record obviously!  A time and place to relax, and think about the world.  So c'mon Duke, check it out!
   

Thursday, March 13, 2014

Various Artists - Live at the Blood and Bones



From yesterday's barstool comes tomorrow's lamp-post cool: stumbling grog and bedfellow freedom pasted top down and mid center.  A special LP tentatively titled, "The More You Order the More You Get," or alternately "Live at the Blood and Bones" (subtitle?) - in any case, it's a variety of artists warming their bellies and rosining the bow in a stoney cafe somewhere south of never never.  I know I may be preaching to the choir, but stuff like this completely owns me even if it doesn't face off with the hyperion finish line.  It's a night carved out just for the blokes.  And maybe tonight they're south of stoked, but the fiddle, well it ain't yet broke.  On display: it's human endearment armed with soft tokes and crowd patter.  Kind of the sonic equivalent of post coital cuddling with a hairy stranger that randomly began giving you a back-rub in a crowded, auburn lit hippie night-cave.  And those little candles blinking bravely as the stone rolls away from the door...






Wednesday, February 26, 2014

Mix for '13: Sample Page Sexy Cut Out


Hey gang.  It took me forever to pull this one together.  Hopefully it was worth the wait.  AOR rubbish and basement treats from dusk til dawn.  Accent on the undulations of light and dark, Hollywood, Atlantis, neon, and flame.  Stay stoked, and get rad in '14!  Peace ~~~ J. D. F.


Saturday, April 13, 2013

Mohs - The Unexamined Life is Not Worth Living


Mysterious, charming, and very rare.  Mohs hailed from New Mexico according to the Acid Archives, but I can find no reference on the LP other than a song title.  Back cover is blank, and no artist names are included on the labels.  But what a stunning visage, that greco-roman blueprint staring sideways, donning real mucklucks for some kind of rocky mountain climb.  Such is the rustic, slightly windblown, but at times manicured, or at least curatorial output of the Mohs, as it were - collective.  We'll defer in that sense, until further information can be elucidated.  Education is important, but so also is getting clam-baked in your camper and recording very completely sincere soft wisdom from a place that is more internally laid back than I think anyone can entirely access anymore.  I bring a tear from my eye.  But listen to the record, enjoy something for crissakes.  Slow down a little bit.  The unexamined life is NOT worth living.  But your life will certainly go on.  Even with their two goofus trax.  Period charm.  You'll have to deal.  Lots of deep stoney gaze.  Immaculate.  Mohs lets dream together.  Good night!



Everything Will Be Alright... (The Ledge - Rock Affair)


This is probably one of my favorite one-trackers of all time.  Which is to say, actually, that the rest of the LP is far from unlistenable.  But one glimpse of the title track with your third ear, and it's sort of game over on their covers of "Dancing in the Moonlight" or wherever else the AM compass was guiding the Ledge's weathered late night live sets at one haunt or another roundbout Hot Springs, Arkansas.  Stunning cover photo, and something ever so cryptic as to where that voice is coming from, even if it's just some soft focus 70s melancholied blue eyed soul.  Totally sends a chill everytime.  Big ups to Rockadelic Rich for turning me onto this!  Another crazy score...

 






Everything Will Be Alright

Thursday, October 18, 2012

Mix-Host Shake-down: Permanent Places, Wide Open Spaces


Hey, Greetings.  After a lot of procrastination I finally got all my mixes uploaded to the server for the indefinite future.  Having received a ton of inquiries about them, and scrambling on and off to upload individual links for thirsty parties, I just decided, f-it, let's make them available for good, for the good - yeah, the good of the people, man!  Haha!  It's a fun breeze through my "personal musical odyssey" (gasp), and a deep well of some really unseemly obscurity, sometimes house-be-rocking, others in time let the knock defrocking.  Sigh.  November may be the finally realized month de blog, in which I really devote some heave-ho to getting stuff up and reeling for your dancing and dining entertainment...  feel like I'm always under a cloud of one kind or another when it comes to really giving this site it's proper re-recognizance.  Life, what was it, what was that thing, I was looking for?  Music... music... music...



Alone Again, Or (2006)

love poem - richard brautigan
better dad than dead - mark levine
ill (worst) - r. stevie moore
frog song - merry airbrakes
Side B, Track 1 ["Untitled"] - david allen coe
mudiang priangan - the steps
one night - the shoes
lonely faces - dave bixby
love out of a crumbling forge - gene f. steiker and larry s. chengges
the fires are burning - charles manson family jams
mists and rains - ruth white
lost at sea - department store santas
inner light - index
in the eyes - virgin insanity
lonely fog - michael yonkers
mr. man - hickory wind
lamentation for hank williams - tina & david meltzer
i don't wanna love ya now - mistress mary
nature is my mother - yays and nays
persephone's song - journey of persephone
fingernail poem - alan watts
open road - hopkins & bradley
a song off of the HALF TRIBE surf lp

DOWNLOAD


Bummer in the Summer (2008)

Side A
Euphoria - Lisa (A Gift From...)
The Dots - ??? (Tape - MA, 80s)
Conte Four - Shangri La (Music for Your Dancing Pleasure)
Ken Nordine - Zebras (Twink)
Michael Farneti - Good Morning Kisses (Good Morning Kisses)
Sonny Padilla Jr. - Dreams and Stories (7")
Gary Neiland - Album Tonight (S/T)
Les Paul and Mary Ford - ???
Music Emporium - Winds Have Changed

Side B
Donnie Bletz - Zip-A-Dee-Doo-Dah (7")
Crystalaugur - You've Got to Rap (Terranaut)
Marc Brandt - Roaring Texas Chief (Back to Better Days)
Dave Lamb and Gye Whiz - I Wonder Why (I'll Be Alright)
Donnie and Joe - Good Time (Dreamin' Wild)
Paul Levinson - Antique Shop (Twice Upon a Rhyme)
Billy Ashe - Friendship Song (You 'n You)
Austin Sirch - Rail Ride (Alter Alert)
Duncan Martin - Propane (Tape) 



You Really Would (2009)

A Wave - Woo
Measurement - Pat Madden
Take Me Home - Bert Keeley
Anthony Burgess - Bing Selfish & the Ideals
Have You Ever Had That Feeling? - Jim Hansen
It's Over - Gatsby
Misty - The Estate
Anybody Home - Dennis Soares
Dogs - Glenn Phillips
Fear of Flying - Jenny MacGregor
Where Are You? - Tim McKenna
Searchin' - Charmer
Universal Person - Grand Canyon
A Simple Thought - Greg Todd & the Jacks
Try Baby - Pat Madden
Diamond Love - Philip John Lewin
Tots in the Way - Ice Skates with Arms
The Stars are Bright - Benny Cook
A Job Well Done - Jo Ann Stokes
The Cleaner - Woo 



Duende (2010)

Keep Workin’ - Misty Hush Revival
- Eric
- Wailing Wall
Stone Phase - Moonlyte
- Utopia
Amor - Saints & Sinners
You Came to Me - Morly Grey
Journey of the Mind - El Gusano
3 AM - Misty Hush Revival
- Collective Tools
Salsa Friquea - Bandolero
On the Brink - Grapes of Rathe
- Eric
Drug Country - New Dawn
Our Love - Dennie Dioguardi
Girl From the Mountain - Ghetto Brothers
- Unity
- Haku
- Grupo Irakere
Outro - Misty Hush Revival




Nocturnal Plant Life (2010)

How Can You Know Yourself? - Cathy Ragland
River - Arica
The Wabe - First Lite
Crimson Dawn - Turiiya
Guide Me to the Light - Rohrbacker, Hendren, & Kingen
Bye Bye - T-Kail
Hey Guy - Harlem Avenue
I Owe It All to You - Froc
Seems Like One of Those Days - Konrad
Black River Lady - Drendall, Thrower, & Friends
Spring - Joey Garone
Atmospheric Dreams - Lightdreams
Dream of the M - Once
Take My Life - Ron Rude 




Exercise Your Face (And Smile) (2011)

Damage Done - Plateau
Midnight on Mopac - Aerosol Lettuce
Sweet Sirene - Zoa
Turnaround - Ambiance
Secret Squirrel
It Gets Me Hot - Slippery When Wet
Hummingbird - Marc, Tim, and Group
No Not Really - Michael Land
A Dream Shared By Two - Tubular Face
Before the Snowfall - Sixth Station
Jesus, Watch Over Me - Jerry Hawkins
Chinga Tu Madre - The Jugs
Blue Sea - Follies Bazaar
The Impossible Dream (Excerpt) - Kay Dennis 




It’s the Same Moon in China

Good Times Rock’n’Roll Band - Khamba Shuffle (Variations)
Summer Wine - Lady of Dreams
Stir Crazy - I Am Free
Pumpkin - Frightened Little Girl
The Calliope - Everybody’s High
Mark Dutton - Sun on the Run
The Waterproof Candle - Electrically Heated Child
Betty Everett - 1900 Yesterday
The Eldees - Don’t Be Afraid to Love
The Westwinds - Summer
Pittsburgh Phil - Don’t Tell Her Lies
Josie Taylor - I’ll Love You For Awhile
Staff & Management - Fresh Dirt
Yellow Hair - Talent for Lovin’
Daisy Clan - San Francisco China Town
Strimbling Blimbles - Perfect Dream
Gloria March - The Other Side of the Moon
Bran’ Spankin’ - You Gotta Change


Hope this all hits the spot, drop me a note if anything specific touches you...

Thursday, September 13, 2012

Reissues to watch!

Donnie Emerson in wintry attire

And so it was...  the summer of Donnie and Joe Emerson!  I must say that I am overjoyed and flabbergasted at the waves of positive energy that have emanated from Light in the Attic's reissue of this magical, one of a kind LP.  Finding the record in  Spokane some 5 or 6 years ago I was blissfully wrapped in its spell, and immediately thrilled with their charm, but never could have expected the love that would pour in from across the globe for these teenage cabin-pop wunderkinds...  I think it speaks to the inherent goodness in personal vision, and the kind of do-it-yourself ethos that permeated the groundwater of American music from the birth of rock-n-roll well into the dawn of indie-rock.  I realize I'm probably just preaching to the choir, but I think that their latter day success elevates a truth in spirit for music in general, and I'm deeply humbled to be apart of that in any way.  So cheers!  If you're looking for more of the goods, I can't recommend these already available, or shortly forthcoming reissues of vintage self-released music enough...


It may seem like an odd place to jump to next, namely the NINETIES, but from my end, there is nothing else out there like Woo's 1990 LP "It's Cosy Inside."  Issued on a small indie label called Independent Project, the LP by this reclusive British duo saw little attention out of the usual circles at the time, but in recent years has caught deep appreciation from fans of lush ambient otherworldly instrumental textures that transcend everything from Eno to New Age to the more etheral branches of the Krautrock wellschpring...  which is no small feat when it all comes down to it, and in their complete originality, and moving tonal vision that encompasses the entire spectrum lying between melancholy and bliss is one of the best records you will hear this fall (if you've never heard before, I guess, that is)...  out on a Drag City and Yoga Records collaborative issue October 2nd, this is absolutely not to be missed.


It would seem our friends at Yoga are on quite the roll this year, as they unfurl the banner of further greatness  in late November with this mad rare beast of 60s pop dementia funneled through central valley realness and drag race pathos...  If you're interested in the wilder underbelly of American pop pre-tofu but post British Invasion, and adore the boy-scout deep down inside Lynch's more unhinged digressions this is the record for you...  there's nothing like it, and that's about one of the highest compliments you can pay in this day and age!  So hi-ho, silver...  check out the amazing doc they made on him too...  he's very much alive and well in the belly of the Californian dream...


From another end of the pool of possessed and catatonic visionary American songsmiths seeing the light of day in the near future is none other than KONRAD - a man so embedded in a fractured 80s consciousness whirling about casio synth rave-ups and extraterrestrial neuroses that it's a wonder he ever managed to write an album's worth of some of the best glitch pop gems you've never heard...  If future science conspiracy, white funk, and New York after hours metro hallucinations are your bag there's nothing better to soothe the soul - or start a completely spontaneous dance party.  I love him to death, and I hope you will too...  (if it's your first time getting this weird) ...  hehe...  due out on a yet un-named imprint in early 2013, so stay tuned!


One of my all time faves for the retro set came straight out of the dustbins of your mind on Guerssen this summer...  a rare LP I was happy to help see back into some kind of circulation for lovers of the low life meeting the high life and rocking late into the nocturnal Gotham skyline...  The original record was a post-posthumous debut of a Staten Island club band that channeled late 60s pop and psychedelic rock for a swirling brew of soulful melancholic dirges and after thoughts to love gone bad or nearly arrived...  a very hard disc to put your finger precisely on what is going down, but something deep and unusual arises over the course of two sides to say the least, and it is no pun intended so close to my heart.  Pick it up if it sounds like your thing...  a rare bird rarely roosts...  or so they say!



In other news, it was a great surprise to find this reissue on our doorstep after trying to elicit the secrets of the Metz puzzle by showcasing their unbelievably rare 45 from after (?) their equally rare LP debut...  to say the least it is a buckwild party machine of an album that others have done way better justice to than I can even begin to do in such a short time here...  please check out my friend Collin's full length report back from the depths of Houston gender bending MDMA wildness...  and pick up the record at a distro near you!


And finally I want to give props to my buddy Nemo's herculean efforts to get out 4 of the highest quality reissues of the year, w/ the quadruple threat of Virgil Caine's "Great Lunar Oil Strike of 1976," Eddie Callahan's "False Ego," The Bachs' "Out of the Bachs," and Drywater's "Backbone of the Nation."  Each one of these records deserves a write-up in and of their own right, but because (I believe) they're mostly sold -out, I'll just briefly speak to the rust-belt basement rock clout of the mighty Drywater who pressed a whopping 25 copies of their ode to teenage heartache and work-a-day blues (I believe the label still has stock on this one!).  It's a deeply American trip into the very heart of private press tomfoolery, and I couldn't recommend it more if those stock cover clouds don't already have you weak in the knees.

Friends, it's been a great time getting to know you all here, and I can only hope I have more to offer in the near future.  Life sails on, and I hope to put out a reissue of my own in the near future (perhaps first and last - but it's a GREAT one, the mighty TURIIYA!), in addition to a variety of film and art projects which are becoming my primary focus now.  Love you all, send me music, and take care -- jdf